Health

OECD – Health Status data 

The five indicators used to compare health status are:

  • Male life expectancy at birth (2016)
  • Female life expectancy at birth for females (2016),
  • Survival to age 65 for males (2016),
  • Survival to age 65 for females (2016),
  • Under age 5 mortality rate per 1 000 live births (2016).

Information from StatsNZ 2014

This data is from the NZ Progress Indicator – Statistics New Zealand

  • Between 1996 and 2006, health expectancy at birth increased 1.7 years for females and 2.7 years for males
  • Health expectancy at birth increased steadily for all females between 1996 and 2006, from 67.5 years to 69.2 years.
  • Health expectancy for all males increased over the same period, from 64.7 years to 67.4 years, closing the gender gap most rapidly between 2001 and 2006.
  • Changes in health expectancy occur over long timeframes.

OECD Better Life Index 2013

OECD Chronic Health Risk factors

(i) Smoking: lower rate than the OECD average of 20.9%

(ii) Excessive Weight Gain: higher than the OECD average –

  • NZ obesity rate is 27.8% OECD 17.2%.
  • Obesity’s prevalence foreshadows increases in the occurrence of health problems
  • such as diabetes
  • cardiovascular diseases and
  • asthma

Overall this contributes to higher health care costs

OECD – Comparative spending on health care

  • Health spending is estimated at 10.3% of GDP – higher than the OECD average of 9.4%.
  • below the OECD average in terms of total health spending per person, at 3 182 USD in 2011, compared with an OECD average of 3 322 USD.
  • Between 2000 and 2010, total health spending in New-Zealand increased in real terms by 5.1% per year on average, a faster rate than the OECD average of 4.0%.
  • This growth rate then slowed down to less than 2.0% per year between 2010 and 2011.

OECD – Comparative spending on health care

  • Health spending is estimated at 10.3% of GDP – higher than the OECD average of 9.4%.
  • below the OECD average in terms of total health spending per person, at 3 182 USDin 2011, compared with an OECD average of 3 322 USD.
  • Between 2000 and 2010, total health spending in New-Zealand increased in real terms by 5.1% per year on average, a faster rate than the OECD average of 4.0%.
  • This growth rate then slowed down to less than 2.0% per year between 2010 and 2011.